Blog Commentary: Managing the Egosystem

12/27/2011

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Blog Commentary: Managing the Egosystem

If you are anything like me, one under-appreciated element to the holiday season is having a few moments to catch up on the ever expanding “to-read” list.  These past few days, in between Walter Isaacson’s Steve Jobs bio and the Hunger Games series, I also managed to get through several articles I’ve bookmarked over the past few months.  One article that jumped out to me was from Lauren Carlson, a CRM Analyst from the blog site, Software Advice.  In her blog, Managing the Egosystem: 6 Rules of Engagement, Lauren provides an overview of her conversation with Brian Solis and his take on, the “egosystem.”

To give some background, the “egosystem” is Solis’s term for this new environment in which technology, social media, etc. has allowed individuals to place themselves at the center of everything.  Solis identifies 6 things that consumers want in the “egosystem”: 1. Value, 2. Efficiency, 3. Trust, 4. Consistency, 5. Relevancy, and 6. Control. 

Since a great majority of our time is spent trying to assist companies’ identify and implement solutions to help them engage and sell more efficiently and effectively, this blog really hit home.  Solis recognizes the business applicability to the paradigm shift in the way in which we interact as a society.  Few will argue against the impact that social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter have had on our world.  Indeed, Facebook is now the primary vehicle many of us use to interact with a lot of friends and family.

The question then becomes, do businesses fully understand how social media and technology affect every element of marketing and sales strategy?  From my experience, the answer to this question is still “no.”  It’s not that companies don’t recognize the overall importance of social media and technology, but more so that a lot of companies don’t fully understand “how” these tools should be utilized to better engage their prospects and customers.               

It’s not enough to create a company page on Facebook.  It’s not effective to tweet random tidbits about your service offerings or products.   It’s not about incessant blogging about your products or services (yes…this was even a mistake we made in the early going).  There is not a cookie cutter approach to interacting with your customer base.  What works for Diddy doesn’t necessarily work for McKinsey and vice versa.  Is social media just as relevant to both brands?  Without a doubt.  But so is the methodology by which it is utilized.     

Since access to information is no longer a premium, when you supply your customers with information, you better make it more substantive than a blatant sales attempt.  The opportunity to interact with your prospects and customers is bigger than ever, but your need to make it relevant and meaningful is more important than ever.  Those who win biggest will be those who figure out how to create valuable interactions and offer real substance to their customers.

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